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Beacon Hill

Part of the Beacon Hill woodland
Part of the Beacon Hill woodland

Archeologically sensitive site-ancient standing stone
Archeologically sensitive site-ancient standing stone

Stack site
Stack site

Timber lorry in clearing stack, William not worried by crane
Timber lorry in clearing stack, William not worried by crane

Incoming chainsaw operative
Incoming chainsaw operative

A heavy fiddly piece wedged on narrow bank on edge of very wet area....mmm
A heavy fiddly piece wedged on narrow bank on edge of very wet area....mmm.

Success with fiddly bit
Success with fiddly bit

A proud moment, it was heavier than it looks
Back through brash for next piece

Back through brash for next piece<
Back through brash for next piece

But beautiful blue skies
William pulling up steep bank

But beautiful blue skies
Heading back into the woodland for our next loads

Someone forgot to crosscut this one-not Colette
Someone forgot to crosscut this one-not Colette

William and Richard heading towards stack
William and Richard heading towards stack

Last day, last lorry load... job done
Last day, last lorry load... job done

This was a large contract taken on by Richard Branscombe which was to both fell and extract large quantities of Beech in this beautiful woodland. The wood was much in need of thinning and there was plenty for us to do. Richard employed 2 cutters to come in and do the felling work, Kipp and I worked alongside him with the extraction and Colette Kyle did all the cross-cutting and stacking. The half of the woodland we were working in had ancient banks of archaeological value and standing stones that needed to be carefully worked round. The other half of the woodland was worked by different contractors using a tractor and forwarder. The client made a careful record of the two work methods and there will be a report available comparing the two jobs and their pros and cons. The timber was extracted pole length where possible, all by arch to protect the ground and then cross cut at the stack site in lengths suitable for converting to firewood.